Thursday, December 06, 2007

First Major Snow

Black and White

Color

We had our first major snowstorm which meant....dress warm, put on my high top boots, load up my camera and take a hike on the golf course. (I need snow shoes, the snow was very deep and hard to walk in). I was outside for about two hours, loving every minute and I will do this more often.

While out in the snow, I was trying to remember instructions my old mentor, shared when taking images of the snow.  I realized after this shoot I need to step up my F-Stop....I think that will help cutting down the blue snow.  I will have  practice this winter for sure. 

9 comments:

madcobug said...

I like both photos. That is a lovely scene with snow on the evergreens. It will unlikely we get any snow here in AL this winter but I need to read more on my camera. I was thinking it has a snow mode, not sure. Thanks for sharing your snow. Helen

radar446 said...

Very nice, we got a flurry yesterday, but nothing stuck as is the norm around here.  Snow is interesting to shoot for several reasons.  I might actually do a tutorial on it in a couple of weeks.  It is not so much your aperture that makes the change, as you need to keep the depth of field that you want in the shot.  What makes the difference is opening the exposure up either with the shutter or just the exposure compensation feature.  You want to meter on the snow itself and assign it a value somewhere between +1.0 and +2.0 depending on how much detail you want to show.  I usually go for +1.7 when I'm shooting snow when metered from a well lit patch.  This keeps it from blowing out, but will also keep it from rendering gray.

Your blue cast that you are seeing is from the color temperature of the scene.  This needs to be corrected for the shot to retain the proper balance.  The best thing to do is to adjust the White Balance to "Cloudy" which will warm the scene up.  If that doesn't work, you can use an 81A warming filter, but don't go any more than the "A" because you will lose the white and have orange snow.

Greg

radar446 said...

Very nice, we got a flurry yesterday, but nothing stuck as is the norm around here.  Snow is interesting to shoot for several reasons.  I might actually do a tutorial on it in a couple of weeks.  It is not so much your aperture that makes the change, as you need to keep the depth of field that you want in the shot.  What makes the difference is opening the exposure up either with the shutter or just the exposure compensation feature.  You want to meter on the snow itself and assign it a value somewhere between +1.0 and +2.0 depending on how much detail you want to show.  I usually go for +1.7 when I'm shooting snow when metered from a well lit patch.  This keeps it from blowing out, but will also keep it from rendering gray.

Your blue cast that you are seeing is from the color temperature of the scene.  This needs to be corrected for the shot to retain the proper balance.  The best thing to do is to adjust the White Balance to "Cloudy" which will warm the scene up.  If that doesn't work, you can use an 81A warming filter, but don't go any more than the "A" because you will lose the white and have orange snow.

Greg

psychfun said...

Beautiful! We didn't get as much. We are suppose to get another 2-4 inches tonight though.

pharmolo said...

Very pretty. We rarely get snow in the Outer Hebrides - usually in March lol

buggieboo1 said...

pretty!


~~Make it a Great day~~

Sharon

http://journals.aol.com/buggieboo1/ImASurvivor/

cmishvicki said...

Betty, lovely image, both versions. If you'd like to keep color, you can change the white balance and/or apply a warming filter in Photoshop. B/W is fine though...as I said.
~Vicki

fasttrack58 said...

Pretty....
Linda :)

donxging said...

The snow is pretty but you can have it. lol   I like the weather we get here in Vegas.
Ginger